Hospital Breastfeeding

#hospitalbreastfeeding

The #hospitalbreastfeeding hashtag was started on Twitter following one mother's experiences breastfeeding her son who has a congenital heart defect. See her story below. This site delivers some key messages developed from the #hospitalbreastfeeding discussions, and helps medical professionals to understand what's in it for them when it comes to supporting breastfeeding in wards and departments.

All of the information on the adjacent downloads can be explored in greater detail by reading the guidance below.

FAQ

KellyMom.com is a website run by an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) which provides evidence based information about breastfeeding and related topics. KellyMom.com provides detailed references to support their statements. Links are provided through to KellyMom.com rather than directly to the evidence they have cited as they have expended considerable effort to compile the data and they deserve full credit for having done so.

The Royal College of Nursing represents nurses and nursing, promotes excellence in practice and shapes health policies.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

UNICEF The UK Baby Friendly Initiative is based on a global accreditation programme of UNICEF and the World Health Organization. It is designed to support breastfeeding and parent infant relationships by working with public services to improve standards of care.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

KellyMom.com is a website run by an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) which provides evidence based information about breastfeeding and related topics. KellyMom.com provides detailed references to support their statements. Links are provided through to KellyMom.com rather than directly to the evidence they have cited as they have expended considerable effort to compile the data and they deserve full credit for having done so.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

KellyMom.com is a website run by an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) which provides evidence based information about breastfeeding and related topics. KellyMom.com provides detailed references to support their statements. Links are provided through to KellyMom.com rather than directly to the evidence they have cited as they have expended considerable effort to compile the data and they deserve full credit for having done so.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

KellyMom.com is a website run by an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) which provides evidence based information about breastfeeding and related topics. KellyMom.com provides detailed references to support their statements. Links are provided through to KellyMom.com rather than directly to the evidence they have cited as they have expended considerable effort to compile the data and they deserve full credit for having done so.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

UNICEF The UK Baby Friendly Initiative is based on a global accreditation programme of UNICEF and the World Health Organization. It is designed to support breastfeeding and parent infant relationships by working with public services to improve standards of care.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

TOXNET Toxicology Data Network is provided by the U.S. National Library of Medicine which is operated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . The LactMed® database contains information on drugs and other chemicals to which breastfeeding mothers may be exposed. It includes information on the levels of such substances in breast milk and infant blood, and the possible adverse effects in the nursing infant. Suggested therapeutic alternatives to those drugs are provided, where appropriate. All data are derived from the scientific literature and fully referenced. A peer review panel reviews the data to assure scientific validity and currency. LactMed is updated monthly.

The Breastfeeding Network (BfN) aims to be an independent source of support and information for breastfeeding women and others. It aims to:

  • Promote breastfeeding and a greater understanding of breastfeeding in the United Kingdom.
  • Collect and disseminate information on breastfeeding and baby and infant nutrition.
  • Provide information and support to parents on the feeding of babies and infants.
  • Set and encourage the acceptance of quality standards for breastfeeding support.
  • Establish and publish codes of practice for such support.

An increasing number of mothers and health professionals have sought to find more information on the levels of medicines passing through milk to the baby. Standard reference books such as the British National Formulary (BNF) provide little information for professionals and parents to make decisions on individual situations. BfN endeavours to provide information to enable mothers to breastfeed their babies for as long as they wish and to provide information on the safety of medicines for each mother and baby pair.

The Drugs in Breastmilk Helpline was set up by BfN in response to the number of calls received concerning medication. The drugline is run on a voluntary basis by a pharmacist who is also a BfN Registered Breastfeeding Supporter.

She receives help with running the line from a BfN Registered Drugline Helper. The service is provided over and above full-time work commitments so calls are generally not answered during the day. Voicemails may be left and calls are returned as soon as possible. The service is open to mothers and professionals. As the time available to deal with breastfeeding support of mothers is limited professionals are encouraged to find out the information to enable them to support the mothers themselves.

Drugs In Breastmilk helpline: 0844 412 4665.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

The Breastfeeding Network (BfN) aims to be an independent source of support and information for breastfeeding women and others. It aims to:

  • Promote breastfeeding and a greater understanding of breastfeeding in the United Kingdom.
  • Collect and disseminate information on breastfeeding and baby and infant nutrition.
  • Provide information and support to parents on the feeding of babies and infants.
  • Set and encourage the acceptance of quality standards for breastfeeding support.
  • Establish and publish codes of practice for such support.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

Emma Pickett is a breastfeeding counsellor providing voluntary support in Haringey and is Chair of the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (http://abm.me.uk/). Emma is also an IBCLC in private practice.

The Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (ABM) is a voluntary organisation founded in 1979 by a group of mothers experienced in breastfeeding counselling. Charity status was awarded to the organisation in 1980. It is their aim “to promote the physical and psychological health of mothers and children through education in the techniques of breastfeeding and to advance the education of the public, especially those persons concerned with the care of children on the health benefits of breastfeeding, both immediate and long term”.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

Emma Pickett is a breastfeeding counsellor providing voluntary support in Haringey and is Chair of the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (http://abm.me.uk/). Emma is also an IBCLC in private practice.

The Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (ABM) is a voluntary organisation founded in 1979 by a group of mothers experienced in breastfeeding counselling. Charity status was awarded to the organisation in 1980. It is their aim “to promote the physical and psychological health of mothers and children through education in the techniques of breastfeeding and to advance the education of the public, especially those persons concerned with the care of children on the health benefits of breastfeeding, both immediate and long term”.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

The Leaky Boob is a blog started in 2010 by Jessica Martin-Weber. The following year, she added The Leaky Boob Relational Resource, of which she says:

“I saw a need to help answer the many reoccurring questions moms, dads and others had about breastfeeding. There are many incredible resources out there that are full of well-researched, evidence based information, this resource is not intended to replace any of those. What The Leaky Boob Relational Resource is intended to be is a collection of articles sharing information in the relational manner that is part of TLB culture. Presenting well-researched, evidence based information with the “pub” feel, a conversation and dialogue, and personal connection that is a hallmark of The Leaky Boob. My vision is that the Relational Resource would be a place to find information for experts that was accurate and supportive, easy to understand, presented in lay-person terminology, and like talking with a good friend.

The Relational Resource is an ongoing work in progress. Featuring materials from the personal voices of doctors, IBCLCs, CLCs, various field experts, and parents. This resource is not intended to be medical advice or medical counsel and readers are greatly encouraged to take personal responsibility for their health and the health of their child by seeking out qualified health care and to fully research all their options independently.”

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

Nursing Nurture is a Breastfeeding Advice and Support blog from Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) Krista Gray. Krista also serves as a La Leche League Leader and has “over a thousand hours of experience supporting breastfeeding moms”. In 2011 she was selected as the sole international recipient of the annual Health-e-Learning scholarship for lactation studies.

Emma Jane Sasaru is a doula and an NHS breastfeeding peer support worker. She trained with the Breastfeeding Network and still volunteers for that organisation, as well as supporting women who have experienced birth trauma or who have had preterm babies.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

The Royal College of Nursing represents nurses and nursing, promotes excellence in practice and shapes health policies.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

Heartmummy.co.uk is not affiliated with any of the websites linked to.

  • Louise's Story - Hospital breastfeeding a child with a congenital heart defect: "a bit more knowledge and compassion around breastfeeding would go a long way"

  • Anna's Story - "I think back with regret about all those missed hours with her"
  • Marie's Story - Hospital breastfeeding a child with Kawasaki disease: "breastfeeding isn't expected or encouraged"
  • Jenny's Story - "I can't believe they didn't offer any help at all to keep me breastfeeding"
  • Gina's Story - "Why was breastfeeding not prioritised by the hospital in any way?"
FAQ

Helen and David's Story

My youngest son, David, was born on 20 September 2013 with a congenital heart defect – hypoplastic left heart syndrome. He was born by c-section at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester and then transferred to Alder Hey at a day old. He had his first open heart surgery at 5 days old, and was tube fed until he was 2½ weeks old. He was then tested for oral feeding capability and started on a bottle. He came home at 3½ weeks old and latched on to my breast at 4 weeks. He has been breastfed ever since.

Hypoplasts traditionally have trouble feeding orally, and to be breastfed is really unusual. I hand expressed colostrum for David before my c-section with the help of my best friend who is a breastfeeding peer supporter, and continued to hand express and then pump express for him throughout his stay in hospital. He had my milk down his tube, then in his bottles, then finally direct from the source!

The breastfeeding support in Alder Hey was not poor – it was adequate but it could be so much better. This is something that I am addressing with the hospital and I am aware of some excellent changes that they are putting in place. I do however have concerns about the support available for breastfeeding across the UK in any circumstances where the baby is suffering from ill health. These babies need breastmilk more not less than others, and so many of the perceived barriers to breastfeeding are myths based on poor understanding. Medical staff working to save lives and help babies recover from serious conditions understandably do not prioritise breastfeeding, so they need help to understand how breastfeeding can help them and how it can be a worthwhile part of comprehensive paediatric care.